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Around 25% of our total business is made up of the transport of dangerous goods. Many companies shy away from this niche market due to its complexity, so we find that many of our competitors make use of our specialism in this sector and utilise our services.

I decided that as Managing Director of Ital Logistics it was my duty to take on the role of Dangerous Goods Safety Advisor (DGSA) in April 2004. Since then I have continued to renew my qualification, and have been joined by Derek Heap as secondary DGSA to the Company. In addition to this, all members of our team involved in this area of our job are awareness trained and refreshed as regulations change.

There are many differences between the road, rail, sea and air regulations, even though with each revision the regulations come closer to alignment. The information contained in this section covers just a selection of topics and should be considered purely as a general guideline, so it is advisable to seek clarification on particular aspects from the relevant publications of ADR (Road), RID (Rail), IMDG (Sea) and IATA (Air).

The UK is an island. Therefore, even just to get into the closest European country, we must use a combination of modes, and as the regulations are not completely aligned, there are precedents. There are also derogations and variations by country within their own territories.

If you require any specific information or advice on the carriage of dangerous goods, please feel free to contact us, either by telephone, or email dgsa@Ital-logistics.com and we will be pleased to assist.

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Classes & Segregation Rules for Dangerous Goods

ADR (Road) is less stringent that IMDG (Sea) in respect of segregation of different classes and so under ADR there are fewer segregation requirements than under IMDG. It should be noted that there are some cases where chemicals of the same class cannot be loaded together (under IMDG in particular), so care should be taken, and the tables should be used as a general guideline only.

The segregation tables can be downloaded here.

How To Complete a Dangerous Goods Note

Both IMDG and ADR require a ‘Dangerous Goods Transport Document’ (DGN as its common acronym), whereas ADR also requires ‘Instructions in Writing’. IMDG and ADR can use the same Dangerous Goods Transport Document as this can be in any form, provided it contains all of the information required by the provisions of the relevant Codes (5.4.1 ADR and IMDG). So, what do we need to put in the ‘DGN’? Below is the basic data required for both modes, unless stated otherwise.

How to complete a Dangerous Goods Note:

The particulars to be entered in the document shall be drafted in an official language of the forwarding country, and also, if that language is not English, French, or German, in English, French or German, unless international road carriage tariffs, if any, or agreements concluded between the countries concerned in the transport operation, provide otherwise.

  1. The UN Number, preceded by the letters “UN”
  2. The Proper Shipping Name (PSN) supplemented, when applicable, with the technical name in brackets when special provision 274 or 318 is mentioned in column 6 of the dangerous goods lists, generic entries, and normally required when the PSN is an ‘N.O.S’ entry. Note that trade names alone are not acceptable
  3. The Hazard Class followed by any subsidiary hazard shown in brackets
  4. The Packing Group, where assigned, for the substance which may be preceded with the letters “PG” (e.g. PG II)
  5. The number and kind of packages e.g. 2 x 250 L steel drums; 3 x fibreboard boxes each containing 48 kg. (There is no need to specify details of inner receptacles or inner packagings, although when shipping as Limited Quantities it is advisable to do so)
  6. The total quantity of each item of dangerous goods bearing a different UN number, proper shipping name, or, when applicable, packing group (as a volume or as a gross mass, or as a net mass as appropriate)
  7. The name and address of the consignor
  8. The name and address of the consignee(s)
  9. A declaration as required by the terms of any special agreement (reserved)
  10. ADR only requirement, but as most movements involve both modes, advisable to input as standard: Where assigned, the tunnel restriction code which should be in capitals enclosed within brackets

Most common additional information:

Flashpoint: If the goods being transported have a flashpoint of 60°C or below, the minimum flashpoint shall be indicated (in °C closed-cup (c.c.))

Marine Pollutant: If the goods are known marine pollutants the words “MARINE POLLUTANT” shall be inscribed on the document

The order of the data formulating the transport document description should be 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 with no information interspersed, except as provided for in ADR or IMDG as relevant. For example:

  1. “UN 1098, ALLYL ALCOHOL, 6.1 (3), I, (C/D), Flashpoint 18°C c.c.”
  2. “UN 1993, FLAMMABLE LIQUID, N.O.S. (Toluene), 3, II, (D/E), Flashpoint 21°C c.c.”

This is by no means definitive as there are many other requirements depending on UN number, class, etc. If anyone has any specific questions, simply emails us at dgsa@Ital-logistics.com and we will be pleased to assist.

Marking & Labelling of Dangerous Goods

Aside of transport, with so many other regulatory requirements for marking and labelling, this is another of those aspects of transporting dangerous goods, both to Europe and beyond, that is often done wrong.

Focusing on the main two modes of transport of Road and Sea, whilst they are similar, there are differences nonetheless. The most stringent of these regulations is IMDG (sea) and I would always recommend that if you mark and label for IMDG as long as the journey is not a mainland movement only which would be subject to ADR (road) only, then you would meet all requirements. So, as a general rule of thumb, excluding any special marking and/or labelling that may be required for specific chemicals, here is a brief summary of the key requirements.

Marking

  1. The UN Number, preceded by the letters “UN” (IMDG & ADR) – for IBCs and packages of more than 450 L capacity, this should be on two opposing sides
  2. The Proper Shipping Name (PSN) supplemented, when applicable, with the technical name in brackets when special provision 274 or 318 is mentioned in column 6 of the dangerous goods lists, generic entries, and normally required when the PSN is an ‘N.O.S’ entry. Note that trade names alone are not acceptable (IMDG only). – for IBCs and packages of more than 450 L capacity, this should be on two opposing sides
  3. Except for single or combination packages of 5 L or less (liquids) or 5 kg or less (solids), when applicable, the Marine Pollutant mark (IMDG)/Environmentally Hazardous Substance mark (ADR) – for IBCs and packages of more than 450 L capacity, this should be on two opposing sides. When required, orientation arrows shall be affixed on two opposite vertical sides (for combination packagings having inner packagings containing liquids, single packagings fitted with vents, and cryogenic receptacles intended for the carriage of refrigerated liquefied gases) (IMDG & ADR)

The markings referred to in sections ‘a’ and ‘b’ above should be at least 12mm in height.

Labelling

  1. Danger label(s) (commonly referred to as ‘hazard diamonds’) for each class/subclass – for IBCs and packages of more than 450 L capacity, these should be on two opposing sides (IMDG & ADR)
  2. For packages containing goods packed in Limited Quantities only, replace the class danger label(s) with the Limited Quantity mark. Note that if the package contains both goods packed in Limited Quantities and goods in full scope, then the Limited Quantity mark is not to be applied as you would be applying a class danger label(s) and you cannot have both.

Whilst IMDG and ADR don’t request shippers name or consignee’s name and address, it is prudent to provide these also. After all, you wouldn’t put an envelope in the post without an address of where it’s going would you!

The aim of Ital Logistics is to provide a quality, reliable and personalised service with openness, honesty and integrity and to always perform to the very best of our abilities.

I need to move freight…

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What a team you have!

Hi Phil. I hope you’re well & keeping busy? I’m emailing to let you know how pleased I am with the service I have received from James in your office this morning. He has somehow managed to get a lorry in to collect a machine at the NEC this afternoon after being given no prior notice! How good is that? It has saved Andrew staying down in Birmingham another day & my stress levels returning to normal!! Always a bonus! The level of service we receive from Steve & Kurtis is always brilliant and now James … what a team you have!

Karen Tarrant Machines Ltd.

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